Porn hacker held in Jakarta

Video taken of the “pornographic” billboard in Jakarta. Source: YouTube

An Indonesian who was arrested for hacking into an electronic billboard displays in South Jakarta and broadcasting a Japanese adult film could face seven years in jail and a heavy fine, according to the capital’s police.

The 24-year-old man, who allegedly broadcast less than 10 minutes of the pornographic movie “Tokyo Hot” at a busy intersection in the capital, could be fined more than US$1 million alongside his jail term, Rappler reported.

The accused, Samudera Al Hakam Ralial, admitted to being responsible for the incident but claimed it was an accident, it was reported, although elsewhere he apparently said it was a joke.

Witnesses said that the film ran for more than five minutes before the authorities shut the screen down by cutting the power but not before it was filmed by several motorists and went viral online.

If charged under the Electronic Transaction Law, Samudera could face a maximum prison sentence of six years and a fine of 1 billion rupiah (US$77,000). Under Indonesia’s Pornography Law he could face up to 10 years behind bars.

“The suspect violated the information and technology law and pornography law,” said Awi Setiyono, spokesman for Jakarta police.

The Japan Times said cyber police arrested the IT specialist on Tuesday with officers saying the man admitted responsibility and claimed he was just having fun.

“The suspect claims he worked alone,” Jakarta Police Chief Muhammad Iriawan told AFP. “But we are still investigating whether he was working alone, whether he had a particular motive or whether he was just fooling around.”

The suspect reportedly saw login details posted on the billboard before he hacked the billboard.

Pornographic websites are blocked in the increasingly restrictive Muslim-majority archipelago and intimate movie scenes are often pixelated or removed by the Indonesian censors.

Last week the collapse of a pedestrian bridge was blamed on a digital billboard, leading the authorities to consider a ban on the screens anywhere that could endanger public safety.